Presentation Quick Tips

Michael Bay's 3 Big Mistakes Every Presenter Must Avoid

Happy New Year! Hope you’ve had a great start to 2014. Unfortunately, Michael Bay started 2014 with a horrible presentation performance.

In this video you'll learn three mistakes Michael Bay, director of Transformers, made during a recent presentation for Samsung at CES (Consumer Electronics Show) 2014. Michael Bay barely started his presentation and abruptly left the stage when things didn't go well while he was speaking.

Not a good thing to do, but a great way for us to learn some presentation mistakes to avoid. Click here to get a video made for your organisation.

Special thanks to PowToon!

http://www.powtoon.com

What a Presentation Must Do Video 1: Are You Entertained?

In this first video of the Presentation Foundation Series, you'll learn one of the key things every presentation must do... Entertain. Before you scream out in shock and disagreement, have a look at the video or skip below to read more about why I'm saying this. If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click the following link to watch or right-click to download: Presentation Foundation Series - What a Presentation Must Do Video 1

Video length 1:41 (Click CC for captions or read transcript below)  

Special thanks again to Powtoon (http://www.powtoon.com) for making this video possible.

Why entertain?

People are constantly bombarded with distractions and the result is most of us have a very short attention span. Your audience is no different. Checking email and reading and/or posting to Twitter and Facebook are probably way more interesting to your audience than your presentation.

Add to that things going on in their personal lives and they have every reason not to listen.

So your presentation must entertain them just to keep their attention. And this applies to every type of presentation.

But I'm not an entertainer!

Neither am I. And you don't have to be one to entertain your audience. You don't have to be a comedian, a juggler, a sword swallower or a champion bird caller to entertain your presentation audience. The point is you don't have to do anything out of character or unusual.

How to entertain

To entertain your presentation audience, you need to get and keep their attention. You do that by getting your audience to experience some sort of emotion. It can be any emotion you like. Happiness, excitement, confusion, anger, frustration, sadness and any other emotion is a form of entertainment.

Where to find the emotion

The emotion, or emotions, come from your presentation content. Sometimes it's easy to find the emotion, but there will be many other times when the emotion is not so obvious. Your job is to dig a little deeper to uncover the emotion. Typically, emotion comes from conflict and the resolution to that conflict.

So look closely for conflict and you'll likely find the emotion. Once you have the emotion, you have a way to entertain your audience and you now understand one of the three key things that a presentation must do.

Let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Thanks.

Carl

 

The Presentation Foundation Series will teach you…

  1. What a Presentation Must Do
  2. What You Must Know About Your Audience
  3. How to Choose the Right Presentation Content
  4. Presentation Structure

 

Transcript:

What is one of the key things that all presentations must do?

Ok, maybe not that.

The fact is, people have better things to do than to sit through another dull presentation.

They've sat through so many dull presentations that they expect every presentation to be the same.

Even your presentations.

But this is actually an opportunity for you to grab the spotlight and take charge of the room.

How you do that is by doing what a presentation must do…

Entertain.

Why?

Why?

Well, because if your presentations do not offer some sort of entertainment, your audience will not pay attention beyond the first few minutes, if you're lucky.

However, being entertained does not mean being a comedian, knowing how to juggle or acting all animated and crazy.

Instead, think about the different emotions your content can help your audience experience.

Anything from happiness to excitement, to fear, to anger, to frustration, to, even sadness, can be a form of entertainment.

You just need to look beyond the surface of your data or information to uncover the emotions…

The things that will entertain your audience and keep their attention.

And there you go…

You just learned one of the key things that all presentations must do…Entertain.

And if that doesn't work, you just might want to learn how to juggle.

Thanks for watching and talk to you next time.

Bye bye.

Presentation Quick Tip #10 - Where to Stand When Giving a Presentation

A common mistake that I see over and over is presenters not appearing confident and comfortable when giving their presentations. Does this affect you? Well, it depends on how you stand when giving your presentations. This is mainly for when you need to present together with slides. Please check out the video or skip down and read more on this topic.

If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click the following link to watch or right-click to download: Presentation Quick Tip #10 - Where to Stand When Giving a Presentation

Video length 1:21 (Click CC for captions or read transcript below)  

Why is how you stand important?

It's important to know good techniques when standing because you will appear confident to your audience, be engaging and be able to get your message across better to your audience. Therefore, you need to know the best ways to stand while giving a presentation.

Stand and deliver

Yes, I know that's a cheap attempt at using a movie reference, but it fits because it means you have to accomplish your presentation's mission. And that mission could be to inform or to persuade, but in reality it's about getting your audience to act in some way. For a great explanation of a presentation's main purpose, getting your audience to take action, head on over to my friend Craig Hadden's blog to learn more.

Here's the angle on standing during a presentation

When you start your presentation, you'll most likely be at the front saying hi. After you do that, follow these 6 tips…

  1. Move to the left side of the screen; the left side from the audience's perspective.
  2. Stand at a 45 degree angle so you can maintain eye contact and see the screen
  3. Use your left hand to point or gesture to items on the screen; use right hand to talk to audience
  4. Move to the right side of the screen to talk about something on that side of the screen
  5. Again, stand at a 45 degree angle so you can maintain eye contact and see the screen
  6. Use your right hand to point or gesture to items on the screen; use left hand to talk to audience

It's much easier than it sounds

Now that you know how to stand in a presentation, you will find that it will be easier to focus on speaking to the audience. Your presentation will immediately improve because of that.

Naturally, nothing will help if you are unprepared so don't make that mistake. Your reputation depends on it.

Try it out and let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Thanks.

Carl

 

Transcript:

Hi, I'm Carl Kwan and this is Presentation Quick Tip #10.

In this one I'm gonna talk about movement and what you should do at the beginning of your presentation, all the way through your presentation.

Now, most presentations begin with you standing at the front of the room.

What you want to do after you begin is to move to the side of your screen and face the audience at approximately a 45 degree angle.

Now do this starting from the left side, from the audience, and talk about whatever is on the left side of your screen.

Then move to the other side when something else you want to talk about on the other side.

And again, face them at a 45 degree angle so you can again refer to your slides and also maintain eye contact with your audience, too.

This is a great way for you to be able to emphasise things and kind of keep movement in your presentation so the audience doesn't get bored.

You can also move in a little bit closer to them when you want to emphasise something.

And move back when you want to talk normally again.

So remember, try to move from side-to-side, facing your audience at approximately a 45 degree angle.

That is Presentation Quick Tip #10.

If you have any questions or comments about this one, please leave them below this video.

Thank you for watching.

Talk to you again soon.

Bye-bye.

Presentation Quick Tip #9 - How to Remember What to Say in a Presentation

The day comes when you have to step up and give your presentation. Hopefully, you've prepared and feel good about what you're about to say. Yes, you're nervous but you go for it. Everything is going well until your stomach drops and your body tenses… You can't remember what you're supposed to say next! Please check out the video or skip down and read more on this topic.

If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click the following link to watch or right-click to download: Presentation Quick Tip #9 - How to Remember What to Say in a Presentation

Video length 1:40 (Click CC for captions or read transcript below)

Mildly unpleasant

To say it is a mildly unpleasant experience is like saying slamming your hand in the car door is better than caffeine at waking you up. Yes, it would work but the bandages would make holding your next cup of java a challenge. The same can be said about forgetting what to say in a presentation… It makes everything else you try to do afterwards as hard as a three year old eating spaghetti and not getting most of it on herself and everywhere else but in her mouth. It might seem ok at the start, but it's a disaster waiting to happen.

Why it happens…forgetting what to say, not the spaghetti part

Several factors can lead to you forgetting what to say. Maybe you didn't prepare well, maybe you have a bad memory, maybe you're exhausted from staying up all night finishing your presentation. But a big reason is that many people try to memorise a script.

Fine for times tables, not fine for presentations

Memorising a presentation script sets you up for trouble for several reasons. First, you have to hope that nothing happens to disrupt your train of thought during your presentation. Second, it's almost impossible to sound natural unless you're Denzel Washington and a professional writer prepared your script. You will also sound like you are talking AT the audience, instead of TO the audience.

If the projector stops working...or a bird flies across the room...you might forget what you were talking about, struggle to remember, get stressed, start sweating and completely forget everything.

A better way

Here are three things you can do to help you remember what to say in a presentation…

  1. First, prepare well in advance. The biggest reason why people forget what they have to say in a presentation is because they think they can prepare at the last minute. I know you won't listen to me, but hopefully after a couple of disasters you will heed my advice.
    • Plus, make sure you know your topic like Sherlock Holmes knows how to read a crime scene.
    • You must also know your audience really well and what they want to hear.
  2. Second, write everything out in point form.
    • Do not write everything in sentences... you'll be tempted to memorise those sentences.
  3. Three, practice, practice, practice.
    • Practice perfect by recording yourself and then watching and listening if you're using filler words like "like" and "um" or "you know," which I'm guilty of.
    • Check to see that you are meeting the time requirements. There is nothing worse than a presenter who goes over time. However, everyone loves a presenter who ends on time or early.
    • While reviewing your video, check if your content is being delivered clearly and if you're speaking well.
    • Check if you need to include something to make your point/message clearer or remove something unnecessary. Just take the time to make your presentation better.

Now you must repeat step number three over and over until you sound natural and look calm and confident in delivering your presentation in the time allowed.

Over time, and with practice...

It will become easier to know what content works and what won't work. You can then focus more on getting better at delivering the presentation and still adjusting the content as needed.

And that's how you remember what to say in a presentation.

Please leave any comments or ask any questions in the comments section below.

Thanks and good luck!

Carl

 

Transcript:

Don't know why I just did that.

Hi, I'm Carl Kwan and this is Presentation Quick Tip #9.

In this video, I'm going to talk about how to remember what to say in a presentation.

First of all, do not try to memorise your script.

It's a big no-no.

If something were to go wrong in the middle of your presentation, you're going to forget everything, you'll be so distracted.

And then you'll be totally screwed.

The second thing is that you may not sound as natural in delivering that.

You'll sound like you are talking at the audience and not talking to the audience.

So what can you do instead?

Well, there are three things you can do.

First of all, prepare well in advance.

Make sure you know your topic really well and also know your audience really well and what they want to hear.

Second of all, write everything out in point form.

Do not write everything in sentences; you'll be tempted to memorise those sentences.

And number three, practice, practice, practice.

But practice by focusing on recording yourself and then watching and listening if you're using filler words like "like" and "um" or "you know," which I'm guilty of.

And also, check to see that you are meeting the time requirements.

Also check if your content is being delivered clearly, if you're speaking well.

And also maybe think about, "OK, can I take something out, can I add something in to my presentation to make it better."

So that is how you remember what to say in a presentation.

Make sure you repeat step number three over and over until you are very natural, calm and confident in delivering your presentation in the time allowed.

That is Presentation Quick Tip #9.

If you have any questions or comments about this one, please leave them below this video.

Thank you for watching.

Talk to you again soon.

Bye-bye.

Presentation Quick Tip #8 - How to Create Presentation Content Your Audience Will Care About

Choosing presentation content is often one of the most difficult tasks a presenter faces… with getting up and giving the presentation right up there, too. So I thought I'd offer a simple, effective tip when you have lots of stuff to talk about or when you're not sure where to start. Please check out the video or skip down and read more on this topic.

If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click the following link to watch or right-click to download: Presentation Quick Tip #8 - How to Create Presentation Content Your Audience Will Care About

Video length 1:23 (Click CC for captions or read transcript below)  

Too much to say, too little time

Most people want to include as much as possible because it seems like the right thing to do. Or it might come from thinking that it's what your teacher or boss wants. The problem is how to fit everything in and meet your time restriction. Or not talk so much and so long that your audience turns into slobbering zombies. Interesting for a movie, but not your presentation.

It's a human thing

The thing to remember is that human beings can only remember approximately four things at a time. If you talk about too much, there's no way they will remember. So it's better to keep the number of topics you cover from three to five.

But I've got a gagillion things to talk about…What do I do!?

Obviously, you can't include a gagillion things, or even a bazillion, which is significantly less…I'm sure. So you need a process to hack away at what's important from what's unimportant. Not only will this help you focus on core topics, but it will help your audience better understand, and remember, the essence of your presentation.

Try this four step process…

Step 1: Make a list of everything you want, or think you should talk about. Everything. Just do a complete data dump and don't worry about what's good or bad.

Step 2: Cut that list in half. Be like a serial presentation content killer. Choose victims that are not necessary for understanding or that will take away from your presentation's focus and hack and slash them off your list.

Step 3: Now look at what your audience wants to hear, their goals, reasons for attending your presentation, etc. You should have identified this early on. Looking at your audience profile, go through your list and remove stuff they don't care about. Be ruthless in doing this, as your audience will thank you for being focused on what they want to hear.

Your audience will continuously pay attention because they are hearing what they want to hear. Always remember to think about why the audience would want to spend their precious time listening to you.

Step 4: Look once again at what you want to say, what the audience wants to hear and knock out anything else that doesn't add value or help you reach your goals and your audience's goals. You should now be able to get down to three to five life changing, universe moving, mind shattering topics… Or at least what you and your audience will be excited about.

So remember

Be ruthless in rooting out content that will not add value to your audience, that will not move them to action, or that will not persuade or motivate them. You can now focus on delivering focused, clearly defined information.

A final tip

If necessary, provide supporting evidence or additional information you didn't talk about in a document. Ideally, give this document to your audience at the end of your presentation so they don't sit there reading it while you're talking. You can even tell the audience that you will cover some core topics, and that everything else will be given to them afterwards.

If you have any questions or comments about this tip, please let me know by writing in the comments section below.

Thank you.

Carl

 

Transcript:

(Whuh, whuh, whuh!)

Pretty fast.

Hi, it's Carl Kwan here and this is Presentation Quick Tip #8.

In this video, you're gonna learn about how to create presentation content that your audience will care about, which is, you know, really important.

What you want to do is take your list of topics that you want to cover, or the points you want to cover, write them all down.

Just throw everything in there.

And then, cut it in half.

Think about what is non-essential, what is essential and just immediately cut it in half.

Then, take your audience's perspective and look at what content they would be interested in and why they would want to spend their valuable time listening to that content.

You'll probably be able to, kwhuh, cut your content in half.

You love that kwhuh, cutting sound, don't you?

Anyway, so cut your content again.

Then, look at your content, look at the topics you want to cover.

And again, go through that list and cut them again.

Try and get down to say, three to five really crucial, important, great pieces of information that you want to share with your audience.

And that is how you create presentation content that your audience will care about.

And this was Presentation Quick Tip #8.

If you have any questions or comments about this one, please leave them below this video.

Talk to you again soon.

Bye, bye.

Presentation Quick Tip #7 - 3 Tips For Using Questions To Start A Presentation

In this Presentation Quick Tip #7 video, you'll learn three tips when using a question to start a presentation. Beginning a presentation with a question is a great idea, as my buddy Jonathan Li recommends. However, you need to be aware of what may happen when you open your presentation with a question. So what you'll learn is what can happen and what to do. Please check out the video or skip down and read more on this topic.

If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click the following link to watch or right-click to download: Presentation Quick Tip #7 - 3 Tips For Using Questions To Start A Presentation

Video length 1:17 (Click CC for captions or read transcript below)  

Here's the thing

There are so many ways to start a presentation. Asking a question is one of the most tried and true methods. However, presenters, especially less-experienced ones, have to be careful because asking a question may not always get you the result you want.

I've seen this many times…

The presenter comes up all ready to go. Slides look nice, the presenter looks fairly confident and the audience is sitting in anticipation. Then the speaker asks a question that he or she has rehearsed and looks out to the audience expecting an answer.

Disaster and panic

Or is that panic and disaster? Either way, what happens next is the audience sits there completely silent. Awkwardness ensues and the speaker asks again. More often than not, our presenter is now frazzled by the experience and is unsure what to do. He or she was going to use the audience's response to segue into the presentation, but the only thing he or she is thinking about is, "Oh crap, now what!?"

Why it happens

Sometimes, people just simply don't know the answer. This can be a good thing because you now have their attention. Sometimes, people are just too shy to answer. This happens a lot in Asian cultures. But something more evil is when people don't want to answer just to see you squirm and get uncomfortable. This can happen if you are being evaluated, like in a sales or investment pitch or if you're speaking to classmates who want to see you get embarrassed. Nasty.

Have no fear, the answer is here

Sorry about the cheesy rhyme. Anyway, to avoid feeling like the temperature suddenly shot up and worrying that your face is now beet red, here are three things to do when using a question to start a presentation…

1. Ask a question, but don't wait too long for an answer

In this case, you can give the answer because people may not know or don't want to answer. Either way, you're not wasting time waiting and it can be an effective way to keep the audience's attention. This works especially well when you are sure they will not know the answer.

2. Ask questions, then ask specific people to answer them

Instead of waiting, just motion or point to someone to answer. This also saves time and it also gets the audience involved. If the first person you ask doesn't know, ask someone else. If nobody knows, great! You have their attention and can now teach them something new.

3. Ask rhetorical questions, questions that make a point and don't need an answer

I like these because they are a great way to get your audience to agree with something you want to say. You can even ask them to raise their hands to say whether they agree or not. One sneaky trick is to use a tag question, something like, "It's nice out, isn't it?" because they always have to agree with what comes before the question. Like I said, sneaky, isn't it? :)

So there you go. Now you know what to do when starting a presentation with a question.

Let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Thanks.

Carl

 

Transcript:

(Wailing)

Bet you thought I was Bruce Lee!

Hi, it's Carl Kwan here and this is Presentation Quick Tip #7.

Now, it's a really good idea to begin your presentations with a question, as my buddy Jonathan Li in Hong Kong recommended.

Now, one thing, though, you do have to be careful of is that sometimes people will not answer because either they don't want to, or because they really don't know the answer.

So there are three things you should do when asking questions.

Number one, ask the question but don't wait too long for an answer.

Number two, ask the question and then point to someone specifically to answer the question for you.

And finally number three, ask a rhetorical question, a question that people already know the answer to.

Then that way, you're not wasting time waiting for people to answer your question, in case they really don't know or they're not being very nice and don't want to answer.

So make sure you do use a question to start your presentations, that's very good, but also be mindful of those three things.

That is Presentation Quick Tip #7.

If you have any questions about this one, please leave them below this video.

Thanks for watching.

Talk to you again soon.

Bye-bye.

Presentation Quick Tip #6 - How To Keep Your Audience Engaged

One of the biggest fears or moments of panic is when you see your audience becoming disinterested in your presentation. They are either not paying attention, being distracted by the latest game or, more than likely, the latest Grumpy Cat photo. Whatever it may be, you as the presenter hate that moment. But it doesn't have to be that way...

Check out the video for a quick explanation of what to do or keep reading for an in-depth look at this topic.

If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click the following link to watch or right-click to download: Presentation Quick Tip #6 - How To Keep Your Audience Engaged

Video length 1:08  

Yes, it's true that people have a limited attention span, but it doesn't mean we have to let that rule, or ruin, our presentations. What you have to do is re-engage or reacquire their attention just before their attention span heads south.

How long before that happens?

Most experts say that human attention span ranges from 5-10 minutes, depending on which expert you're referring to. With so many distractions, especially from always present smart phones, I'm sure the limits of human attention have gone down.

In the case of presentations, it's better to err on the lower end of the scale. Therefore, I suggest re-engaging or re-acquiring the audience's attention once every 3-5 minutes.

Great, but how the heck do I do that??

To be honest, it actually doesn't matter what you do. The point is that if you've been speaking for a few minutes, you have to break the monotony and snap people out of their trance. I'm not saying that your content is boring. I'm just saying that you must do something.

For example, you could show, or talk about, something relevant to your presentation. A video demonstrating your point is always good. In fact, Apple uses this technique in all their presentations.

Another thing you could do is give your audience an interesting fact or statistic that reinforces what you're saying. Again, just make sure it's relevant.

If you have time and it's appropriate, or if you plan it, you could tell a personal story related to your topic. But be careful that the outcome of your story isn't predictable or your audience will lose interest before you ever finish.

Finally, a live demo of some sort can also be used. If possible, get your audience directly involved to connect them what you're saying in a more direct, tangible way.

The point is...

Whatever you do, just make sure you do it and be aware of your presentation's timing so your audience never has a chance to go off into la-la land... Unless that's what you're trying to do.

Thanks and talk to you next week.

Carl

 

Transcript:

Hi, it's Carl Kwan here with Presentation Quick Tip #6.

In this week's video, you're going to learn about how to time and space out the content in your presentation to keep your audience from getting bored.

Now, everyone has a very limited attention span.

They can only pay attention for maybe 3-5 minutes, maybe 7 minutes if you're lucky.

So what you wanna do is after 3-5 minutes, you wanna say, "But here's something really interesting."

And then present a fact or a statistic or some kind of really interesting piece of information that will re-engage your audience.

And make sure though that that piece of information really is interesting or they're still gonna be bored.

So remember, if you want to engage your audience and keep their attention, and make sure they don't kinda start dozing off, every 3-5 minutes introduce something that is going to be interesting to them…A stat or a figure, or whatever kind of fact or information that they will find interesting, that'll re-engage them.

And that is Presentation Quick Tip #6.

If you have any questions or comments, please leave them below this video.

Thanks for watching.

Talk to you again soon.

Bye-bye.

Presentation Quick Tip #5 - How to Structure Your Presentation Like a Good Story

  One of the great revelations in public speaking or presenting has been to include a story in your speech or presentation. Of course, storytelling in presentations or public speaking is not something new, but it is something that causes people a lot of stress.

So in this Presentation Quick Tip #5, I want to show you a very simple way to think about storytelling in your presentations.

Check out the video for what to do and read more below the video. You'll also find the video transcript there, too.

If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click to view or right-click here: Presentation Quick Tip #5 - How to Structure Your Presentation Like a Story

Video length 1:12 YouTube embed: All you need to know you learned as a child

Remember when as a child, you heard stories about monsters and heroes, and princesses and princes? If you remember those, then you most certainly remember that all of them started with an introduction, some conflict and then some sort of resolution.

The great thing is that that is the exact structure you can use for your presentations.

How to apply storytelling structure to presentations

When structuring your presentation content, remember the following…

First…

Every story has a main character, a hero. In a presentation, the main character or hero is the main topic or points you want to make.

Second…

Every story has an enemy, an antagonist. In a presentation, this will be the challenges, problems and consequences of the main topic or points.

And third…

Every story has a beginning, middle and ending. In a presentation, the beginning is your introduction or background of your topic.

The middle contains the challenges and problems, and the consequences of those challenges and problems.

The ending is the hero overcoming the enemy. In a presentation, you can now present your ideas or the solution to resolve the challenges and problems you described previously.

Does this work for every presentation?

The quick answer would be yes, but every presentation is different. However, when you're stuck thinking about how to structure your content, you can always fall back on what you've learned here.

Remember to think in terms of a beginning that introduces, a middle that describes conflict and an ending that resolves the conflict and saves the world so you can kiss the girl. Ok, I made that last part up, but since we're talking about storytelling…

Thanks and let me know if you have any questions.

Be sure to subscribe to my free newsletter so you don't miss tips like this and other cool stuff, too.

Carl

 

Transcript

Hi, it's Carl Kwan here. And this is Presentation Quick Tip #5.

In this video, I'm going to talk about how to structure your presentation like a good story.

Every story has a main character, which is going to be your main points or topics that you want to cover.

Every story also has an enemy, which is going to be the problems or challenges faced by those main points and topics that you want to cover.

Every story also has a beginning, middle and end.

So the beginning is going to be the background, the introduction to everything else.

Then, the middle is going to be the problems and the things that are going to be challenging your main points.

Then finally, you want to have an ending, which is going to be presenting your solution, presenting your possible way to overcome the problems and challenges faced by your audience or whatever your topic is.

So once again, how to structure your presentation like a good story…

Make sure you have a good main character, an enemy and also the beginning, middle and ending structure, as well.

So that is Presentation Quick Tip #5.

If you have any questions or comments about this one, please leave them below this video.

Thank you for watching and talk to you again soon.

Bye-bye.

Presentation Quick Tip #4 - How to Make Boring Content Interesting

Look out! It's Presentation Quick Tip #4! In this one, you're going to learn how to make seemingly boring presentation content interesting. Many of the presentations you will have to give in your professional career will involve facts, figures or data of some kind. Most presenters will simply regurgitate everything like a sports announcer calling a boxing match…

"A right cross, a left jab, a hook, another hook…"

Although that's fine in a boxing match, it doesn't work out so well in a presentation. You've probably heard some version of the following…

"This shows last quarter's sales results. In October, we sold four thousand, nine hundred eighty dollars and twenty-seven cents worth of the XYZ Wizbang Widget. That's down eight hundred blah, blah, blah…"

I'm guessing you didn't even read all that, right? I'm right, aren't I?

Of course not… That stuff is so incredibly boring!!! Yes, I know there are people and times when we have to show that.

I'm not arguing that you shouldn't show the facts, figures or data. What I want you to know is that it is far more interesting to the audience if they know the how and why…THE STORY…behind the facts, figures or data.

So to find out what to do, watch Presentation Quick Tip #4 or you can skip down and read the video transcript.

Thanks and let me know if you have any questions.

If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click the following link to view or right-click to download the video: Presentation Quick Tip #4 - How to Make Boring Content Interesting

Video length 1:18 (Almost not a Quick Tip!)  

Transcript:

Hi, it's Carl Kwan here with Presentation Quick Tip #4.

Ok, so in this week's video, I'm gonna talk about when you have facts and figures and some other information that may not be so interesting.

You know, you might think it's boring.

Well, how do you present that so that it is interesting?

Well, if you have facts and figures that you have to present, look at what is really, really important within those facts and figures.

Figure out, "Well, why should people listen to what I have to say here?"

And only choose the things that are really important.

The rest of the information, the audience can simply just look at it and pretty much understand it.

But what they don't know is the why or how behind those facts and figures.

So what you have to do then, is choose the most important thing, or the main point, from that particular slide and talk about the why and how from that particular item.

And give a little background story and information about that.

That will make that information much more interesting and relevant to your audience.

That's how you can make facts or figures, that may be boring, into something a lot more interesting for your audience.

And that is Presentation Quick Tip #4.

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