how to start presentation

How to Start a Presentation: Expression to Introduce Idea, Concept or Opinion [VIDEO]

Here is a presentation expression you can use to start a presentation and introduce an idea, concept or opinion that will help you stand out from other presenters. https://youtu.be/2BQe8D1q0jE

What it is

The expression is "In today's society, it's more important than ever to…” and it helps you connect the audience to something they are already aware of, or that is generally common knowledge, to the idea, concept or opinion that you want to present.

Why Use It

It’s ok to start your presentation with a basic introduction, but sometimes you don’t have that much time or you want to do something different to stand out from other presenters.

And being different from other presenters is important in any kind of presentation because your presentation is likely not the only one the audience has heard, or will listen to.

Why it’s effective

When you use an expression like this, it gets the audience to agree with something you are saying. And when they agree with you, it’s easier for them to listen to what you have to say afterwards.

Think of it as warming up before you do an activity. It’s a lot easier and safer than just jumping right in.

And it should be pretty obvious to the audience what will come next in your presentation because you’ve already introduced the bigger picture to them.

Examples

  • "In today's society, it's more important than ever to have skills in various areas if you want to advance your career."
  • "In today's society, it's more important than ever to spend some time in nature if you want to stay healthy."
  • "In today's society, it's more important than ever to have strong presentation skills."

So that’s how you can start a presentation and introduce an idea, concept or opinion. Hope that helps and let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Thanks.

Originally posted at http://presentationexpressions.com/how-to-start-a-presentation-expression-to-introduce-idea-concept-or-opinion-video

Hooks, Meat and Payoffs in Presentations: Gavin McMahon Interview

In this video about starting a presentation, I interview Gavin McMahon, co-founder of fassforward consulting group and blogger on the topics of PowerPoint, presenting, communication and message discipline at http://makeapowerfulpoint.com. Gavin shares some excellent tips, ideas, and insight on what presentations really are and how to make sure you start a presentation on the right foot. I learned a lot and I'm sure you will, too. Powerful Takeaways

One of the most powerful takeaways was how Gavin talked about when you only consider what you want to say and not what the audience wants to hear, you automagically create a monologue. Yep, it's magic and it's automatic… Instant monologue in a poof of PowerPoint pixels. But that's exactly what happens to most presenters.

Most presenters are so concerned with what they want to say, that they completely forget that it's the audience that will sit and listen. And if what you're saying doesn't matter to them, then they're gone, both emotionally and mentally. That means they've stopped paying attention and stopped caring. Don't let it happen to you!

A Client's Tale

In fact, it did happen to a client. He gave a presentation to over 100 officials from around the world, assuming that what he wanted to say was what the audience wanted to hear. After talking to him about it, the light came on… But it was too late. He had already given the presentation. Live and learn. Anyway...

There are a couple other gems in the interview. I don't want to ruin the moment by putting them all down here. Watch the video and find out for yourself.

Thanks to Gavin for taking the time to talk to me.

You can find Gavin at:

  • http://www.fassforward.com
  • http://makeapowerfulpoint.com
  • https://twitter.com/powerfulpoint

Technical stuff:

  • Video recorded via Skype
  • Edited in FCPX

Additional footage from the Internet Archive:

  • http://archive.org/details/basic_typing_1
  • http://archive.org/details/safety_in_offices
  • http://archive.org/details/BrightYo1958