presentation content tips

What You Must Know About Your Audience Video 3: Consequences

This is the third and final part of the Presentation Foundation Series about knowing your presentation audience. In this video, you'll learn why and how to use consequences to get your audience's attention and to get them to take action. Please check out the video or skip down to read more.

If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click the following link to watch or right-click to download: Presentation Foundation Series - What You Must Know About Your Audience Video 3: Consequences

Video length 1:59 (Click CC for captions or read transcript below) Special thanks again to Powtoon (http://www.powtoon.com) for making this video possible.

Before we start, if you haven't seen the previous Presentation Foundation Series videos, then have a look at those by clicking the following:

What a Presentation Must Do Video 1: Are You Entertained?

What a Presentation Must Do Video 2: Reward

What a Presentation Must Do Video 3: Create Action

What You Must Know About Your Audience Video 1: 8 Essential Questions

What You Must Know About Your Audience Video 2: Why should they care?

Short blog post this week because it's been unusually busy for me…

But here's the thing you need to know about people and consequences…

We all live with a certain amount of consequences whether we take action or not. Those consequences can be powerful motivators to get people to act a particular way. That same psychology can be applied to your presentations.

However, you need to spend some time carefully thinking about what the consequences would be for your audience if they didn't listen to your presentation. You also need to think about what would happen if they didn't take action on what you are going to tell them.

Once you know what the consequences are, use the major consequences at the beginning to get your audience's attention. Use the others throughout your presentation to reinforce your message and to refocus your audience from time-to-time.

Short one as I said…Let me know what you think and if you have any questions.

Thanks.

Carl

 

Transcript:

Guess who said, "Nothing is worth doing unless the consequences may be serious."

If you guessed Noble Prize and Oscar winner George Bernard Shaw, you get well, a pat on the back.

In this third and final video on what you must know about your audience, you're going to learn how consequences can help you create presentation content that will motivate your audience to listen to you and take action.

As George Bernard Shaw said, people will not be motivated enough to do something unless the consequences are serious.

What that means is that you need to carefully consider what the consequences would be for your audience if they didn't listen to your presentation.

You should make a list of all the possible consequences your audience may suffer or experience. The deeper you can get into consequences, the better you'll be able to figure out what content will get your audience's attention and get them to take action. What you're trying to do is shake your audience from their mental and emotional comfort zone and make them realize that what you have to say is going to be critically important to them. This will take some time because you have to go beyond the obvious answers you'll first come up with.

But once you have that list of consequences, what you should do is use the major ones at the beginning of your presentation and use the others at different times during your presentation.

There you go. You now know how to use consequences to create content that will motivate your audience to listen to you and take action.

If you have any questions or comments about this, please leave them in the comments section below. And remember to subscribe to my YouTube Channel and sign up for my newsletter at CarlKwan.com so you don't miss a thing.Thanks for watching and talk to you next time.

Bye-bye.

What You Must Know About Your Audience Video 2: Why should they care?

This is the second part of the Presentation Foundation Series and will cover your presentation audience. In this second video about audience, you'll learn one of the most important questions you need to ask about your presentation audience: Why should they care? Knowing your presentation audience and what their possible motivations are for listening to your presentation is critical to having a successful presentation. In other words, DO NOT skip this step!

Please check out the video or skip down to read more.

If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click the following link to watch or right-click to download: Presentation Foundation Series - What You Must Know About Your Audience Video 2: Why should they care?

Video length 1:40 (Click CC for captions or read transcript below) Special thanks again to Powtoon (http://www.powtoon.com) for making this video possible.

Before we start, if you haven't seen the previous Presentation Foundation Series videos, then have a look at those by clicking the following:

What a Presentation Must Do Video 1: Are You Entertained?

What a Presentation Must Do Video 2: Reward

What a Presentation Must Do Video 3: Create Action

What You Must Know About Your Audience Video 1: 8 Essential Questions

Why you should know why they should care

I'm hoping that you're starting to see how important it is to know your presentation audience. It all comes down to making sure you talk to your audience about what they care about. The reason is people only care about themselves. If you don't know what your audience cares about, then there's a great chance your presentation will not give you the results you hope for.

The most likely outcome is you'll see your audience either dozing off, looking bored or be very happy that you've stopped talking.

How to ask "Why should they care?"

One important thing to remember here is to ask this question immediately after you know your presentation topic. This is easy for people who are assigned a presentation and/or topic to cover. But even if you have to come up with your own topic, asking "Why should they care?" can help you uncover your topic.

Three step process

I recommend using a mind map, white board or just a list on a piece of paper. Personally, I like mind maps on my Mac and also using Evernote.

  1. Do a brain dump and just write down anything you can think of that would make your audience care, that would motivate them to listen.
  2. Go through your list and cut it down to a top five.
  3. Go through the top five and cut those down to a single main reason or perhaps the top two or three reasons.

In Step 3, really try to get it to one reason because this will be something you can use throughout your presentation. Knowing this single main reason will also help you stay focused when creating your content.

However, if you really discover that there are two or three reasons, that's okay, too. In that case, rank them in order of importance and make your content according to that ranking.

What you might find out

Two things can happen after you've worked on the content. First, when you've determined why the audience should care and you have your content, you might find that the initial answer to "Why should they care?" will be different.

This happens because once you've worked on the presentation, you may have a revelation about what the audience REALLY wants to hear. Don't ignore this. It's better to fix the content than to present the wrong thing to your audience.

The second thing that may happen is you'll confirm that your answer to "Why should they care?" is correct. You'll find that your presentation seems cohesive and stays focused on what your audience wants to hear. Plus, you'll have a sense of confidence that the presentation is going to be successful.

Now you know

Remember to always ask, "Why should they care?" right from the beginning of your preparation. DO NOT SKIP this step. It is a mission critical step that will make your presentation a success or failure.

Coming up

Next time, I'm going to share with you one final way to get into your audience members' heads and ensure that you know what content to include. If you haven't signed up for my newsletter, then please sign up now so you don't miss anything.

Thanks.

Carl

 

Transcript:

Oh yeah? What do you care!?

In this Presentation Foundation Series video, you're going to learn one of the most important questions you need to ask your self about your presentation audience:

Why should they care?

The answer to that question will help you understand what will motivate your audience to listen to you.

So you have to ask yourself why the audience should care about your presentation right from the beginning.

It doesn't matter what your topic is or what content you think is important to include.

The key is figuring out what the prime motivations are for your audience to listen to you, to somehow be persuaded by what you have to say.

So DO NOT skip this step and DO NOT assume you know what the answer is.

What you should do is make a list of all the possible reasons why your audience should care.

Next, go through the list and decide what the top five reasons are.

Then go through the top five and cut the list down to a single, main reason or maybe even the top two to three reasons.

At that point, you'll have a clear idea as to what will motivate your audience to listen to you, and most importantly, care about what you have to say.

There you go. You now know one of the most important questions you need to ask about your presentation audience: Why should they care?

If you have any questions or comments about this, please leave them in the comments section below. And remember to subscribe to my YouTube Channel and sign up for my newsletter at CarlKwan.com so you don't miss a thing.Thanks for watching and talk to you next time.

Bye-bye.

What You Must Know About Your Audience Video 1: 8 Essential Questions

This is the second part of the Presentation Foundation Series and will cover your presentation audience. In this first video about audience, you'll learn the first of three things that are important to know about your presentation audience. I'll show you 8 essential questions you must answer if you want to have a successful presentation. Knowing your presentation audience and what their possible motivations are for listening to your presentation is critical to having a successful presentation. In other words, DO NOT skip this step! Please check out the video or skip down to read more.

If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click the following link to watch or right-click to download: Presentation Foundation Series - What You Must Know About Your Audience Video 1: 8 Essential Questions

Video length 1:52 (Click CC for captions or read transcript below) Special thanks again to Powtoon (http://www.powtoon.com) for making this video possible.

Before we start, if you haven't seen the three videos about what a presentation must do, then have a look at those by clicking the following:

  1. What a Presentation Must Do Video 1: Are You Entertained?
  2. What a Presentation Must Do Video 2: Reward
  3. What a Presentation Must Do Video 3: Create Action

Why people mess up their presentations

The most common mistake I see when consulting people or companies on their presentations is that the presenter doesn't give enough thought or consideration into who his or her audience is. Almost everyone I meet spends way too much time focusing on what he or she wants to say and not enough on what the audience wants to hear. This is a critical mistake.

In fact, knowing your audience is one of the most important, if not the most important, part of preparing your presentation.

Do not assume

It's far too easy to assume what your audience wants to hear and even easier to completely mess up your presentation because you didn't know your audience. The worst part is you might not even know you messed up.

But if you've ever noticed that your audience isn't paying attention or you didn't get the result you were hoping for, it's pretty safe that you didn't know your audience as well as you should have.

A brief story about assuming

A client of mine was very proud of an important presentation he gave to an international audience. There are about 300 high-ranking people from his industry in attendance. I was eager to learn and help him replicate his success so I asked him about the presentation.

As he explained, I got this uneasy feeling in my stomach because I knew I would have to tell him some bad news. Everything he told me about his presentation content were things that his audience already knew. Not only did they know it, but they were likely experts on the subject.

So what my client did was essentially bore his audience to death. At the same, he degraded his own reputation and credibility by not offering anything new and not showing off his own expertise.

Avoid the mess…and boring your audience to death

So here are eight essential questions you need to answer to help you paint a picture of your audience, and most importantly, what their possible motivations are for listening to your presentation.

1. Are they male or female?

2. How old are they?

3. What do they look like, as in their physical appearance and how they dress?

4. Where do they live?

5. What kind of job do they have?

6. What do they do for fun?

7. What is their education level?

8. What is their social status?

Now you know

You can now get a pretty good picture of who your audience is. Make sure you go through these 8 questions every time you prepare a presentation. DO NOT SKIP this step. It will be easy to want to but do so at your own risk.

Coming up

In the next two videos I'll talk about how you can better understand your audience's motivations so that your presentation content matches up with what your audience wants to hear.

Thanks and talk to you next time.

Carl

 

Transcript:

In this video, you're going to learn the first of three things that you must know about your presentation audience so you don't completely mess up your presentation.

Ok so knowing your audience is one of the most important, if not the most important, part of preparing your presentation.

It's far too easy to assume what your audience wants to hear and even easier to completely mess up your presentation because you didn't know your audience.

The worst part is you might not even know you messed up.

But if you've ever noticed that your audience isn't paying attention or you didn't get the result you were hoping for, it's pretty safe to say you didn't know your audience as well as you should have.

So here are eight essential questions you need to answer to help you paint a picture of your audience, and most importantly, what their possible motivations are for listening to your presentation.

1. Are they male or female?

2. How old are they?

3. What do they look like, as in their physical appearance and how they dress?

4. Where do they live?

5. What kind of job do they have?

6. What do they do for fun?

7. What is their education level?

And finally 8, what is their social status?

And there you go. You can now get a pretty good picture of who your audience is.

In the next two videos I'll talk about how you can better understand your audience's motivations so that your presentation content matches up with what your audience wants to hear.

So be sure to subscribe to my YouTube Channel and subscribe to my newsletter at CarlKwan.com so you don't miss a thing.

Thanks for watching and talk to you next time.

Bye-bye.

What a Presentation Must Do Video 3: Create Action

This is the third video in the Presentation Foundation Series. In the first two videos in the Presentation Foundation Series, you learned two of the most important things that a presentation must do…Entertain and reward. In this week's video, you'll learn the third thing that a presentation must do…Create action. Please check out the video or skip down to read more.

If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click the following link to watch or right-click to download: Presentation Foundation Series - What a Presentation Must Do Video 3: Create Action

Video length 1:47 (Click CC for captions or read transcript below) Special thanks again to Powtoon (http://www.powtoon.com) for making this video possible.

What do you mean "action"?

Now, when I say that your presentation must create action, I'm not talking about audience participation or stuff like that. What I'm talking about is what should happen at the end of your presentation.

When you end your presentation, be sure to give the audience some kind of action related to what you just talked about. The reason why is because as the presenter, you and your content need to lead your audience. From the beginning of your presentation to the end, you've hopefully done something to get the audience's attention, entertained them and rewarded them, leading them through your presentation.

Here's the thing

But if you just end the presentation after your Q&A, or conclusion, or whatever, your audience will feel somewhat lost, like they were expecting something but didn't get it. Or they may leave wondering what they should do with what they've just learned from you. Even worse is if they leave and immediately forget what they just heard.

What to do

So to properly end your presentation and give your audience a sense of closure, be sure to end every presentation with some kind of call-to-action. This can be to contact you, or steps they should take to implement what you talked about… It just needs to be something your audience can actually do.

It has to feel doable to your audience. In other words, whatever your action is, it must be simple and easy to understand. You can't tell them to do something they can't, won't, or don't want to do. If necessary, outline the exact steps your audience should take to accomplish the action.

For another perspective on this topic, my buddy Craig Hadden at RemotePossibilities.Wordpress.com wrote a great article about action, too. Click the following link to see Craig's article: Why present? JFK said it all…

There you go. You just learned the third most important thing that a presentation must do…Create action.

And here's my call-to-action…

If you have any questions or comments about this topic, please leave them in the comments section below.

And please be sure to subscribe to my YouTube Channel or sign up for my newsletter so you don't miss a thing.

Thanks and talk to you next time.

Carl

 

Transcript:

In this video, you'll learn the third thing that a presentation must do…Create action.

Now, when I say that your presentation must create action, I'm not talking about audience participation or stuff like that.

What I'm talking about is what should happen at the end of your presentation.

From the beginning of your presentation to the end, you've hopefully done something to get the audience's attention, entertained them and rewarded them, leading them through your presentation.

But if you just end the presentation after your Q&A, or conclusion, or whatever, your audience will feel somewhat lost, like they were expecting something but didn't get it.

Or they may leave wondering what they should do with what they've just learned from you.

Even worse is if they may leave and immediately forget what they just heard.

So to properly end your presentation and give your audience a sense of closure, be sure to end every presentation with some kind of call-to-action.

This can be to contact you, or steps they should take to implement what you talked about… It just needs to be something your audience can actually do.

It has to feel doable to your audience.

There you go. You just learned the third most important thing that a presentation must do…Create action.

And here's my call-to-action…

If you have any questions or comments about this topic, please leave them in the comments section below.

And please be sure to subscribe to my YouTube Channel or visit my website at CarlKwan.com and sign up for my newsletter so you don't miss a thing.

Thanks for watching and talk to you again soon.

Bye-bye.

What a Presentation Must Do Video 2: Reward

This is the second video in the Presentation Foundation Series and will focus on why your presentation content must be a reward for your presentation audience. If you missed the first video about why a presentation needs to entertain, please click the following link: What a Presentation Must Do Video 1: Are You Entertained? Please check out the video or skip down to read more on this topic.

If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click the following link to watch or right-click to download: Presentation Foundation Series - What a Presentation Must Do Video 2

Video length 1:55 (Click CC for captions or read transcript below) Special thanks again to Powtoon (http://www.powtoon.com) for making this video possible.

Preparation takes time

When you prepare a presentation, you have to put in a certain amount of time and effort. This is necessary if you want to communicate your message to your audience and to confidently give your presentation. It doesn't matter what the presentation is about and who it is for. You need to put in the time and energy if you expect to get a good result.

Good presentations are good for you

Giving a successful presentation with an outcome you expect is like a reward for you. And having good presentation skills will help you on many levels, especially when it comes to work. A lot of times, people with good presentation skills are generally seen as more competent, capable and confident.

However, that's looking at how presentations are rewarding for you.

Actually, your audience deserves the reward

As important as presentations are to you, the key thing you have to focus on is how your presentations are rewarding for your audience. Whatever your presentation is and whoever it's for, the content must provide value to your audience. In other words, your presentation has to be a return on your audience's time and energy investment.

What kind of reward?

You have to be sure that your presentation content satisfies your audience's needs and expectations. You need to know who your audience is and what value they are expecting. Once you know that, add something of extra value that your audience didn't expect.

This could be extra information, tips or a step-by-step process that helps your audience solve a problem or overcome a challenge. What it is specifically will depend on the audience and situation. But in most cases there will be an opportunity to provide extra value, a reward, to your audience.

Does this take extra work on your part?

Of course it does. But the benefit is your presentation will stand out because of the extra value, the reward, that you provided. Not only that, but your audience will be much more engaged during your presentation because you are speaking their language… You are communicating in a way that shows they are important, not you.

Too many presenters focus on what they want to say and completely forget, or worse, don't care about, what the audience wants to hear.

Recap

The second thing a presentation must do is reward your audience by giving them something of extra value that they didn't expect in exchange for their time and energy investment. Take the time to understand your audience and your audience's needs. Satisfy those needs and give them something more. Your audience will be happy and you'll be happy, too.

Remember, it's not about you, it's about them.

Thanks.

Carl

 

Transcript:

In the first Presentation Foundation Series video, you learned one of the three things that a presentation must do…entertain.

In this second video, you'll learn the second thing that a presentation must do…reward.

Preparing a presentation and ultimately giving a presentation is a time consuming process.

It might be something you need to do for business, school, or interviews.

A lot of times, people with good presentation skills are generally seen as more competent, capable and confident.

However, that's looking at how presentations are rewarding for you.

The key thing you have to focus on is how your presentations are rewarding for your audience.

Whatever your presentation is and whoever it's for, the content must provide value to your audience.

In other words, your presentation has to be a return on your audience's time and energy investment.

So you have to be sure that your presentation content satisfies your audience's needs and expectations.

You need to know who your audience is and what value they are expecting.

Once you know that, add something of extra value that your audience didn't expect.

Does this take extra work on your part?

Of course it does.

But the benefit is your presentation will stand out because of the extra value, the reward, that you provided.

So to recap…The second thing a presentation must do is reward your audience by giving them something of extra value that they didn't expect in exchange for their time and energy investment.

Let me know if you have any questions or comments and be sure to subscribe to my Channel or sign up for my newsletter at carlkwan.com.

Thanks for watching and talk to you next time.

Bye bye.

What a Presentation Must Do Video 1: Are You Entertained?

In this first video of the Presentation Foundation Series, you'll learn one of the key things every presentation must do... Entertain. Before you scream out in shock and disagreement, have a look at the video or skip below to read more about why I'm saying this. If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click the following link to watch or right-click to download: Presentation Foundation Series - What a Presentation Must Do Video 1

Video length 1:41 (Click CC for captions or read transcript below)  

Special thanks again to Powtoon (http://www.powtoon.com) for making this video possible.

Why entertain?

People are constantly bombarded with distractions and the result is most of us have a very short attention span. Your audience is no different. Checking email and reading and/or posting to Twitter and Facebook are probably way more interesting to your audience than your presentation.

Add to that things going on in their personal lives and they have every reason not to listen.

So your presentation must entertain them just to keep their attention. And this applies to every type of presentation.

But I'm not an entertainer!

Neither am I. And you don't have to be one to entertain your audience. You don't have to be a comedian, a juggler, a sword swallower or a champion bird caller to entertain your presentation audience. The point is you don't have to do anything out of character or unusual.

How to entertain

To entertain your presentation audience, you need to get and keep their attention. You do that by getting your audience to experience some sort of emotion. It can be any emotion you like. Happiness, excitement, confusion, anger, frustration, sadness and any other emotion is a form of entertainment.

Where to find the emotion

The emotion, or emotions, come from your presentation content. Sometimes it's easy to find the emotion, but there will be many other times when the emotion is not so obvious. Your job is to dig a little deeper to uncover the emotion. Typically, emotion comes from conflict and the resolution to that conflict.

So look closely for conflict and you'll likely find the emotion. Once you have the emotion, you have a way to entertain your audience and you now understand one of the three key things that a presentation must do.

Let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Thanks.

Carl

 

The Presentation Foundation Series will teach you…

  1. What a Presentation Must Do
  2. What You Must Know About Your Audience
  3. How to Choose the Right Presentation Content
  4. Presentation Structure

 

Transcript:

What is one of the key things that all presentations must do?

Ok, maybe not that.

The fact is, people have better things to do than to sit through another dull presentation.

They've sat through so many dull presentations that they expect every presentation to be the same.

Even your presentations.

But this is actually an opportunity for you to grab the spotlight and take charge of the room.

How you do that is by doing what a presentation must do…

Entertain.

Why?

Why?

Well, because if your presentations do not offer some sort of entertainment, your audience will not pay attention beyond the first few minutes, if you're lucky.

However, being entertained does not mean being a comedian, knowing how to juggle or acting all animated and crazy.

Instead, think about the different emotions your content can help your audience experience.

Anything from happiness to excitement, to fear, to anger, to frustration, to, even sadness, can be a form of entertainment.

You just need to look beyond the surface of your data or information to uncover the emotions…

The things that will entertain your audience and keep their attention.

And there you go…

You just learned one of the key things that all presentations must do…Entertain.

And if that doesn't work, you just might want to learn how to juggle.

Thanks for watching and talk to you next time.

Bye bye.

Presentation Content Quick Tips - Presentation Foundation Series

Starting this month, I've got a new set of presentations videos called the Presentation Foundation Series that will teach you about presentation content. This series of videos will be perfect for anyone who has ever asked, "What should I talk about in my presentation?", or "What should I include?", or "How should I get started?" Check out the video below to learn more or skip down and read what the Presentation Foundation Series is all about.

If YouTube is unavailable in your area, please click the following link to watch or right-click to download: Presentation Foundation Series - Presentation Content Quick Tips

Video length 1:44 (Click CC for captions or read transcript below)  

Special thanks again to Powtoon (http://www.powtoon.com) for making this video possible.

Why the Presentation Foundation Series?

One of the most popular questions I receive is how to choose presentation content. I love getting questions from people but I noticed I was getting similar questions over and over. So I thought it was a good time to talk about some tips for choosing presentation content. I also realized this topic was fundamental to becoming a good presenter so I decided to call it the Presentation Foundation Series.

What's in the Presentation Foundation Series?

There will be four parts to the Presentation Foundation Series. Each part will have three videos for a total of twelve videos. The four parts are:

  1. What a Presentation Must Do
  2. What You Must Know About Your Audience
  3. How to Choose the Right Presentation Content
  4. Presentation Structure

I'm excited about bringing these videos to you and hope you learn a lot from them. To ensure you don't miss any of the videos, subscribe to my YouTube Channel or sign up for my newsletter.

Thanks and see you next week with "Presentation Foundation Series Part 1: What a Presentation Must Do"

Carl

 

Transcript:

Do your presentations lack that wow factor?

Does the majority of your audience look forward to your presentations, not because they want to listen but because they'll be able to pass out and catch up on some sleep?

Do you know if your presentations are going to get the job done?

Those are the dilemmas that you and everyone else faces everytime you have to give a presentation.

And make no mistake...you will have to give presentations. You will need to pitch an idea, give a report, talk about your business to potential customers, try to land the greatest job or deal of your career, or... the very first job of your career.

To help you succeed in those situations, I'm going to roll out my Presentation Foundation Series of videos. The Presentation Foundation Series will cover what a presentation must do, what you must know about your audience, how to choose the right presentation content and a presentation structure to help you put everything together.

So be sure to subscribe to my YouTube Channel and then head over to my website at carlkwan.com to sign up for my newsletter so you don't miss a thing.

Thanks for watching and see you next time for the first of three videos about what a presentation must do.

Bye for now.